With so many brands releasing so many clubs it can be hard to keep up, so in this series I’m going to go through the offering brand by brand and talk a little about what I’ve seen from them in a fitting scenario.
Today we’re having a look at Titleist.

 

In the woods department, Titleist’s latest release, the TSi line, have been some of the most impressive drivers I’ve seen all year. This line offers a number of models that will appeal to all kinds of players. The TSi1 is the super lightweight offering, this is designed for slower swing speeds who want to make the most out of their swing and maximise their distance, it tends to spin a bit more in quicker players hands which I’ve found quite helpful at times. The TSi2 and TSi3 are the models you’ll most often see with Titleist tour players. The longer TSi2 has a deeper CG, giving speed across all of the face and allowing stability on off centre strikes, whereas the TSi3 is a more classic shape with a lower spin profile, however I’ve still found this driver to be more forgiving than people expect. The TSi3 also has the benefit of a moveable weight track to dial in your flight and promote the best shape for you. Where I’ve really found these drivers excel is ball speed, I rarely find they come out second best when compared to other drivers out there right now in that sense. The fairway woods run with the same models as the drivers and what I love about them is the offer a 16.5 degree wood in the TSi2 and TSi3, offering players who need a bit more loft some extra help off of the deck.

 

Titleist re-released the T-series irons with minor improvements across the board. The T300 is the game improvement iron, offering great launch and plenty of forgiveness. The T200 starts to get towards more of a player’s profile, often suiting better ball strikers who want less loft and more distance, or suiting players who have enough speed but aren’t confident enough in they’re strike to play the skinnier irons. The T100s are the most eye catching irons they offer and a model you’ll often see one tour. With a small profile they suit a players eye but still have a cavity to provide a bit of help with ball speed and forgiveness. This also comes in the T100s, a stronger iron geared towards more ball speed and a flatter flight. A really cool option for either a driving iron or an easier to hit long iron is the U505 utility, available in steel and graphite shafts to give you loads of options and loads of ball speed in that area of the bag.

 

Titleist’s Vokey wedges have always been famous for their bounce and grind options and that is still a major strength. Meaning with the right specs you can have 3 wedges to give you all of the shot options you’d ever need in your short game, offering 23 different loft, bounce and grind options. The SM8s have been successful as ever with Vokeys, so the soon to be released SM9s will hopefully carry on in that vein.

 

Everyone knows that one of the sexiest putters you can have in the bag is a Scotty Cameron. You know what you get with a Scotty, the milled face giving loads of feedback and a distinctive, solid feel. The current offering encompasses the classic Newport blade, with larger backed blades like the squareback. Alongside this there is the Phantom line, if you need a mallet, these putters have less toe-flow which means they’re closer to a face balanced putter, if that’s a style that benefits you.

If you’re into your tech and want to read more about what manufacturers currently have to offer, check back in here to see what I’ve found from all of the other companies’ offerings!